How to Move Your LakeMat Pro

A 12′ x2 4′ LakeMat Pro covers just over 280 square feet. If it’s placed in four different spots during one growing season, it will control 1,120 square feet of lake weeds, so it’s a good idea to move it every 30 days. It’s best to have two people move your LakeMat Pro — you can do it by yourself, I’ve done it — and it’s much easier with two people.

After a LakeMat Pro has sat awhile, it will have sediment on it — and may have formed a weak vacuum seal with the lake bottom — especially if there’s much clay in the soil. You may not be able to just pick it straight up off the bottom — and you may need to clean some sediment off first, depending on how much has accumulated. Gently break it loose from the lake bottomPull up the plastic stakes (if you used them). Break the LakeMat Pro loose from the lake bottom by gently lifting the ends and rocking it back and forth, toward each other. You’ll feel it begin to lift up. Once it’s free, raise it above the surrounding lake weeds and glide it through the water. It’s going to feel heavy at first, but it will glide once you get it going.

Don’t try to lift it out of the lake, it will be too heavy. As you move it through the water, the current you create should wash over the LakeMat Pro surface removing most of the silt in the process. This is hard to explain in writing, but it’s simple once you see it happening. You can shake it back and forth to wash off even more silt. Once you’ve reach your new spot, gently push your LakeMat Pro down to the bottom, push in the plastic stakes (if you use them), and walk over it to help the fabric settle.

Try to leave LakeMat Pro in at least two feet of water for the winter. The last time you move it for the year, try to leave your LakeMat Pro in water at least two-feet deep — and leave it there for the winter, if you can. Remember, if you have to take your LakeMat Pro out of the lake for some reason, it is very heavy when wet. Just pull one edge to shore, let it drain — then pull it up a little more and let it drain some more. Repeat this until the entire Mat is dried out. Then it will be light enough to carry on dry land.


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