Frequently Asked Questions



General

Absolutely! They provide habitat and protection for fish and waterfowl, they’re a food source, they recycle oxygen and carbon dioxide, they help prevent shoreline erosion and filter water particles. They become a problem when there is an overgrowth of aquatic weeds, especially on your beach front.

Yes, I leave mine in all year. You can take them out if you want to, but it's a lot of work and completely unnecessary.

Yes, but lily pads are a tough customer. The best thing to do is cut them back and put one of our Mats over them as early in the season as possible. If they're on shore, you can use a black, plastic tarp to place over them. The idea is the deprive them of sunlight. But they are tenacious!

I would. The thing about muck is, it releases a lot of gases in the summer and it moves around easily. The more tension you create over the top of it, the better off you are. Some people don't use all the plastic stakes, but for best results, I'd use them all.

It depends on what country, or state you're in, and sometimes, even what county or water body! If you speak with your regulatory agency, you'll want to tell them you're interested in installing a "seasonal benthic barrier." Most areas won't require a permit if it's something you put in and take out like a swim raft. If you're getting a MuckMat or BoatLift-Mat, it's primary purpose is to provide a "seasonal" platform to walk on. Most areas have no policy on lake bottom platforms.

It depends. If you have a lot of foot traffic, (boats, kids and dogs) that will keep sediment from building up. However, once a year or so (depending on how much sediment is floating in the water) you’ll want to sweep it off, blow it off, or if you’re really ambitious, take it out of the lake and wash it off. I don't suggest this last method, but it’s up to you.

Zebra mussels like structure, like your dock, your boat, or you if you stand still long enough. Our Mats are flat, like the bottom and aren't really attractive to zebra mussels. They move across the Mats, but don't stay there. They'll be about as scarce on our Mats as they are on open, sandy areas.

The only simple answer is use either a LakeMat Pro or a MuckMat Pro. The frame will keep it square and cause it to sink. I'd also suggest fastening some type of weights on the four corners to hold it in place until it settles on the bottom... yes, I'd leave the weights on it even after it settles.

No. That said, if someone is dumb enough to be fishing in shallow, weedy water, with a non-weedless hook, and they're dumber still to let it sink to the bottom and the hook gets stuck in the Mat, they will break their line trying to get it out. Doesn't happen often. At my current cottage, I've had eight Mats in for four years. Over that time I've had one lure caught on one Mat. Just pull backwards, and the lure comes out easily. If you have a bumper crop of dumb fishers, you may have more lures to pull out, but it's not likely.

Yes, it's especially easy to connect LakeMat and MuckMat simply by fastening the frames to each other. We had one guy who did 16 Mats! It's common for people to fasten two, three, and four together.

LakeMat and MuckMat will sink by themselves fairly quickly. It may take a few minutes. You can help it along if you wish.

Absolutely! They provide habitat and protection for fish and waterfowl, they’re a food source, they recycle oxygen and carbon dioxide, they help prevent shoreline erosion and filter water particles. They become a problem when there is an overgrowth of aquatic weeds, especially on your beach front.

Yes, I leave mine in all year. You can take them out if you want to, but it's a lot of work and completely unnecessary.

Yes, but lily pads are a tough customer. The best thing to do is cut them back and put one of our Mats over them as early in the season as possible. If they're on shore, you can use a black, plastic tarp to place over them. The idea is the deprive them of sunlight. But they are tenacious!

I would. The thing about muck is, it releases a lot of gases in the summer and it moves around easily. The more tension you create over the top of it, the better off you are. Some people don't use all the plastic stakes, but for best results, I'd use them all.

It depends on what country, or state you're in, and sometimes, even what county or water body! If you speak with your regulatory agency, you'll want to tell them you're interested in installing a "seasonal benthic barrier." Most areas won't require a permit if it's something you put in and take out like a swim raft. If you're getting a MuckMat or BoatLift-Mat, it's primary purpose is to provide a "seasonal" platform to walk on. Most areas have no policy on lake bottom platforms.

It depends. If you have a lot of foot traffic, (boats, kids and dogs) that will keep sediment from building up. However, once a year or so (depending on how much sediment is floating in the water) you’ll want to sweep it off, blow it off, or if you’re really ambitious, take it out of the lake and wash it off. I don't suggest this last method, but it’s up to you.

Zebra mussels like structure, like your dock, your boat, or you if you stand still long enough. Our Mats are flat, like the bottom and aren't really attractive to zebra mussels. They move across the Mats, but don't stay there. They'll be about as scarce on our Mats as they are on open, sandy areas.

The only simple answer is use either a LakeMat Pro or a MuckMat Pro. The frame will keep it square and cause it to sink. I'd also suggest fastening some type of weights on the four corners to hold it in place until it settles on the bottom... yes, I'd leave the weights on it even after it settles.

No. That said, if someone is dumb enough to be fishing in shallow, weedy water, with a non-weedless hook, and they're dumber still to let it sink to the bottom and the hook gets stuck in the Mat, they will break their line trying to get it out. Doesn't happen often. At my current cottage, I've had eight Mats in for four years. Over that time I've had one lure caught on one Mat. Just pull backwards, and the lure comes out easily. If you have a bumper crop of dumb fishers, you may have more lures to pull out, but it's not likely.

Yes, it's especially easy to connect LakeMat and MuckMat simply by fastening the frames to each other. We had one guy who did 16 Mats! It's common for people to fasten two, three, and four together.

LakeMat and MuckMat will sink by themselves fairly quickly. It may take a few minutes. You can help it along if you wish.

Absolutely! They provide habitat and protection for fish and waterfowl, they’re a food source, they recycle oxygen and carbon dioxide, they help prevent shoreline erosion and filter water particles. They become a problem when there is an overgrowth of aquatic weeds, especially on your beach front.

Yes, I leave mine in all year. You can take them out if you want to, but it's a lot of work and completely unnecessary.

Yes, but lily pads are a tough customer. The best thing to do is cut them back and put one of our Mats over them as early in the season as possible. If they're on shore, you can use a black, plastic tarp to place over them. The idea is the deprive them of sunlight. But they are tenacious!

I would. The thing about muck is, it releases a lot of gases in the summer and it moves around easily. The more tension you create over the top of it, the better off you are. Some people don't use all the plastic stakes, but for best results, I'd use them all.

It depends on what country, or state you're in, and sometimes, even what county or water body! If you speak with your regulatory agency, you'll want to tell them you're interested in installing a "seasonal benthic barrier." Most areas won't require a permit if it's something you put in and take out like a swim raft. If you're getting a MuckMat or BoatLift-Mat, it's primary purpose is to provide a "seasonal" platform to walk on. Most areas have no policy on lake bottom platforms.

It depends. If you have a lot of foot traffic, (boats, kids and dogs) that will keep sediment from building up. However, once a year or so (depending on how much sediment is floating in the water) you’ll want to sweep it off, blow it off, or if you’re really ambitious, take it out of the lake and wash it off. I don't suggest this last method, but it’s up to you.

Zebra mussels like structure, like your dock, your boat, or you if you stand still long enough. Our Mats are flat, like the bottom and aren't really attractive to zebra mussels. They move across the Mats, but don't stay there. They'll be about as scarce on our Mats as they are on open, sandy areas.

The only simple answer is use either a LakeMat Pro or a MuckMat Pro. The frame will keep it square and cause it to sink. I'd also suggest fastening some type of weights on the four corners to hold it in place until it settles on the bottom... yes, I'd leave the weights on it even after it settles.

No. That said, if someone is dumb enough to be fishing in shallow, weedy water, with a non-weedless hook, and they're dumber still to let it sink to the bottom and the hook gets stuck in the Mat, they will break their line trying to get it out. Doesn't happen often. At my current cottage, I've had eight Mats in for four years. Over that time I've had one lure caught on one Mat. Just pull backwards, and the lure comes out easily. If you have a bumper crop of dumb fishers, you may have more lures to pull out, but it's not likely.

Yes, it's especially easy to connect LakeMat and MuckMat simply by fastening the frames to each other. We had one guy who did 16 Mats! It's common for people to fasten two, three, and four together.

LakeMat and MuckMat will sink by themselves fairly quickly. It may take a few minutes. You can help it along if you wish.


Lakemat

Yes, it prevents aquatic weed growth 100%, naturally, easily and inexpensively. LakeMat® provides a weed free area exactly where you want leaving other areas natural and undisturbed.

No, your LakeMat® material is porous, it allows gases to escape. For example, a square foot of tarp lets zero gallons of water pass per minute. Another (non-approved) product we found lets through just four gallons per minute. LakeMat® lets through 90 gallons of water per minute. In addition, we include "gas release ports" to allow the gases to escape

Aside from managing aquatic weeds, your LakeMat® also acts as a tension barrier. Think of it like a snowshoe over deep snow. By dispersing your weight, it holds you up. It may still feel a little soft, but you won’t sink in up to your knees. And, you won’t feel the muck and soft sediment on your feet. It feels something like walking on a felt carpet. (Note: We encountered one small lake where we put down a 20 foot pole and didn’t reach any firm lake bottom. Although rare, such ponds are dangerous to walk in under any circumstances. We do not recommend LakeMat®, or anything other than avoiding them altogether).

As long as you clean it off once a year or so, (sweep it or blow it off) it will last longer than you will. We guarantee the material for five years, but that's very conservative. The fabric manufacturers project if it received no UV light whatsoever, it will last 20,000 years. So if we go with just 1% of that, it should last much longer than we will.

Yes, it prevents aquatic weed growth 100%, naturally, easily and inexpensively. LakeMat® provides a weed free area exactly where you want leaving other areas natural and undisturbed.

No, your LakeMat® material is porous, it allows gases to escape. For example, a square foot of tarp lets zero gallons of water pass per minute. Another (non-approved) product we found lets through just four gallons per minute. LakeMat® lets through 90 gallons of water per minute. In addition, we include "gas release ports" to allow the gases to escape

Aside from managing aquatic weeds, your LakeMat® also acts as a tension barrier. Think of it like a snowshoe over deep snow. By dispersing your weight, it holds you up. It may still feel a little soft, but you won’t sink in up to your knees. And, you won’t feel the muck and soft sediment on your feet. It feels something like walking on a felt carpet. (Note: We encountered one small lake where we put down a 20 foot pole and didn’t reach any firm lake bottom. Although rare, such ponds are dangerous to walk in under any circumstances. We do not recommend LakeMat®, or anything other than avoiding them altogether).

As long as you clean it off once a year or so, (sweep it or blow it off) it will last longer than you will. We guarantee the material for five years, but that's very conservative. The fabric manufacturers project if it received no UV light whatsoever, it will last 20,000 years. So if we go with just 1% of that, it should last much longer than we will.

Yes, it prevents aquatic weed growth 100%, naturally, easily and inexpensively. LakeMat® provides a weed free area exactly where you want leaving other areas natural and undisturbed.

No, your LakeMat® material is porous, it allows gases to escape. For example, a square foot of tarp lets zero gallons of water pass per minute. Another (non-approved) product we found lets through just four gallons per minute. LakeMat® lets through 90 gallons of water per minute. In addition, we include "gas release ports" to allow the gases to escape

Aside from managing aquatic weeds, your LakeMat® also acts as a tension barrier. Think of it like a snowshoe over deep snow. By dispersing your weight, it holds you up. It may still feel a little soft, but you won’t sink in up to your knees. And, you won’t feel the muck and soft sediment on your feet. It feels something like walking on a felt carpet. (Note: We encountered one small lake where we put down a 20 foot pole and didn’t reach any firm lake bottom. Although rare, such ponds are dangerous to walk in under any circumstances. We do not recommend LakeMat®, or anything other than avoiding them altogether).

As long as you clean it off once a year or so, (sweep it or blow it off) it will last longer than you will. We guarantee the material for five years, but that's very conservative. The fabric manufacturers project if it received no UV light whatsoever, it will last 20,000 years. So if we go with just 1% of that, it should last much longer than we will.


Muckmat

Yes, but eventually sediment will land on the sand allowing weeds to start growing again. If you have a blower to get the sediment off, while leaving the sand, this will work fine. Or, if you don’t mind adding more sand every couple years, this should work too. Many states however, don’t “cotton” to people dumping sand in lakes, so you’ll need to be cool about this.

Yes, if you look at the video of me standing on it, I’m right at the edge. Then you’ll see me step off into the muck...Yuck!

Yes, just like the LakeMat®. In fact, a MuckMat® is a LakeMat® with a special material added to the bottom to allow you to walk on muck. Will lake weeds grow up through the gas release ports? Life is tenacious. So yes, eventually a lake weed or two may grow through the gas release ports, just like grass pushes through concrete on land. However, pulling out a couple small weeds here and there is much better than dealing with a whole beach front full of weeds and muck, isn't it?

Sure, a little. Sediment will land on it too. But you'll never sink it the muck again. As I've said elsewhere, just blow or sweep off the sediment that gets on your Mat.

Yes, the original LakeMat and MuckMat comes with line and plastic stakes. The new Pro series comes with long zip-ties and plastic stakes.

Aside from managing aquatic weeds, your MuckMat® also acts as a tension barrier. Think of it like a snowshoe over deep snow. By dispersing your weight, it holds you up. And, you won’t feel the muck and soft sediment on your feet. It feels something like walking on a felt carpet.

There are two reasons, (soil control experts will quibble with this, but I’m writing for people with muck problems, not experts) The first reason is, soft soils such as muck, move sideways, or “laterally” if you like big words. When you step in any soft soil, mud, or muck the reason you sink is the soil moves sideways, taking the path of least resistance. Not much soil actually moves down. As the muck moves to the sides it creates space for your foot to sink down, because you’re heavier than the muck. So, the trick is to prevent the soil from moving sideways. That’s what the MuckMat® does. Square holes, or “apertures” if you really like big words, catch the soil as it moves and locks it place. Think of it as a giant snowshoe, it creates a thin veneer of soft soil that can’t move. The second reason (yes, soil experts, I know this is part of the first reason) is weight distribution. Just like a snowshoe spreads your weight across a larger surface, so does the MuckMat®. Think of it this way. When Sir Walter Raleigh laid his coat over a mud puddle so Queen Elisabeth wouldn’t soil her feet, both his coat and the queen’s foot sunk, (no rigidity or tension). However, if he’d put down a sheet of plywood, the queen would have pranced right over it and Raleigh wouldn’t have ruined his coat. A MuckMat® creates a “rigid” surface with its own “tension,” like a sheet of plywood, except it’s fllexible. To recap: a MuckMat® keeps muck from moving, it distributes your weight and provides rigidity to the surface of the soil so you don’t sink in the muck. And that’s why it works.

As long as you clean it off once a year or so, (sweep it or blow it off) it will last longer than you will. Even if you never clean it off, you won't sink in the muck ever again. We guarantee the material for five years, but that's very conservative. The fabric manufacturers project if it received no UV light whatsoever, it will last 20,000 years. So if we go with just 1% of that, it should last much longer than we will.

Yes, but eventually sediment will land on the sand allowing weeds to start growing again. If you have a blower to get the sediment off, while leaving the sand, this will work fine. Or, if you don’t mind adding more sand every couple years, this should work too. Many states however, don’t “cotton” to people dumping sand in lakes, so you’ll need to be cool about this.

Yes, if you look at the video of me standing on it, I’m right at the edge. Then you’ll see me step off into the muck...Yuck!

Yes, just like the LakeMat®. In fact, a MuckMat® is a LakeMat® with a special material added to the bottom to allow you to walk on muck. Will lake weeds grow up through the gas release ports? Life is tenacious. So yes, eventually a lake weed or two may grow through the gas release ports, just like grass pushes through concrete on land. However, pulling out a couple small weeds here and there is much better than dealing with a whole beach front full of weeds and muck, isn't it?

Sure, a little. Sediment will land on it too. But you'll never sink it the muck again. As I've said elsewhere, just blow or sweep off the sediment that gets on your Mat.

Yes, the original LakeMat and MuckMat comes with line and plastic stakes. The new Pro series comes with long zip-ties and plastic stakes.

Aside from managing aquatic weeds, your MuckMat® also acts as a tension barrier. Think of it like a snowshoe over deep snow. By dispersing your weight, it holds you up. And, you won’t feel the muck and soft sediment on your feet. It feels something like walking on a felt carpet.

There are two reasons, (soil control experts will quibble with this, but I’m writing for people with muck problems, not experts) The first reason is, soft soils such as muck, move sideways, or “laterally” if you like big words. When you step in any soft soil, mud, or muck the reason you sink is the soil moves sideways, taking the path of least resistance. Not much soil actually moves down. As the muck moves to the sides it creates space for your foot to sink down, because you’re heavier than the muck. So, the trick is to prevent the soil from moving sideways. That’s what the MuckMat® does. Square holes, or “apertures” if you really like big words, catch the soil as it moves and locks it place. Think of it as a giant snowshoe, it creates a thin veneer of soft soil that can’t move. The second reason (yes, soil experts, I know this is part of the first reason) is weight distribution. Just like a snowshoe spreads your weight across a larger surface, so does the MuckMat®. Think of it this way. When Sir Walter Raleigh laid his coat over a mud puddle so Queen Elisabeth wouldn’t soil her feet, both his coat and the queen’s foot sunk, (no rigidity or tension). However, if he’d put down a sheet of plywood, the queen would have pranced right over it and Raleigh wouldn’t have ruined his coat. A MuckMat® creates a “rigid” surface with its own “tension,” like a sheet of plywood, except it’s fllexible. To recap: a MuckMat® keeps muck from moving, it distributes your weight and provides rigidity to the surface of the soil so you don’t sink in the muck. And that’s why it works.

As long as you clean it off once a year or so, (sweep it or blow it off) it will last longer than you will. Even if you never clean it off, you won't sink in the muck ever again. We guarantee the material for five years, but that's very conservative. The fabric manufacturers project if it received no UV light whatsoever, it will last 20,000 years. So if we go with just 1% of that, it should last much longer than we will.

Yes, but eventually sediment will land on the sand allowing weeds to start growing again. If you have a blower to get the sediment off, while leaving the sand, this will work fine. Or, if you don’t mind adding more sand every couple years, this should work too. Many states however, don’t “cotton” to people dumping sand in lakes, so you’ll need to be cool about this.

Yes, if you look at the video of me standing on it, I’m right at the edge. Then you’ll see me step off into the muck...Yuck!

Yes, just like the LakeMat®. In fact, a MuckMat® is a LakeMat® with a special material added to the bottom to allow you to walk on muck. Will lake weeds grow up through the gas release ports? Life is tenacious. So yes, eventually a lake weed or two may grow through the gas release ports, just like grass pushes through concrete on land. However, pulling out a couple small weeds here and there is much better than dealing with a whole beach front full of weeds and muck, isn't it?

Sure, a little. Sediment will land on it too. But you'll never sink it the muck again. As I've said elsewhere, just blow or sweep off the sediment that gets on your Mat.

Yes, the original LakeMat and MuckMat comes with line and plastic stakes. The new Pro series comes with long zip-ties and plastic stakes.

Aside from managing aquatic weeds, your MuckMat® also acts as a tension barrier. Think of it like a snowshoe over deep snow. By dispersing your weight, it holds you up. And, you won’t feel the muck and soft sediment on your feet. It feels something like walking on a felt carpet.

There are two reasons, (soil control experts will quibble with this, but I’m writing for people with muck problems, not experts) The first reason is, soft soils such as muck, move sideways, or “laterally” if you like big words. When you step in any soft soil, mud, or muck the reason you sink is the soil moves sideways, taking the path of least resistance. Not much soil actually moves down. As the muck moves to the sides it creates space for your foot to sink down, because you’re heavier than the muck. So, the trick is to prevent the soil from moving sideways. That’s what the MuckMat® does. Square holes, or “apertures” if you really like big words, catch the soil as it moves and locks it place. Think of it as a giant snowshoe, it creates a thin veneer of soft soil that can’t move. The second reason (yes, soil experts, I know this is part of the first reason) is weight distribution. Just like a snowshoe spreads your weight across a larger surface, so does the MuckMat®. Think of it this way. When Sir Walter Raleigh laid his coat over a mud puddle so Queen Elisabeth wouldn’t soil her feet, both his coat and the queen’s foot sunk, (no rigidity or tension). However, if he’d put down a sheet of plywood, the queen would have pranced right over it and Raleigh wouldn’t have ruined his coat. A MuckMat® creates a “rigid” surface with its own “tension,” like a sheet of plywood, except it’s fllexible. To recap: a MuckMat® keeps muck from moving, it distributes your weight and provides rigidity to the surface of the soil so you don’t sink in the muck. And that’s why it works.

As long as you clean it off once a year or so, (sweep it or blow it off) it will last longer than you will. Even if you never clean it off, you won't sink in the muck ever again. We guarantee the material for five years, but that's very conservative. The fabric manufacturers project if it received no UV light whatsoever, it will last 20,000 years. So if we go with just 1% of that, it should last much longer than we will.

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